Fleeting Past and Flickering Present

The departure from Los Angeles after each trip always ends up feeling like the lingering chapter of a nostalgic music piece.  Remnants of the cozy sunshine and breezy ocean gradually fade out and transition into something wilder and earthier,  before we enter into the familiar scenes up north.   The delight of visiting some hidden destinations studded along the lengthy pathway between the Los Angeles and San Francisco metropolises has become a vital part of our Southern California trips.

This time in January of 2018, we chose to take a detour along the historic US 101.  Santa Monica Mountains, the range separating the LA basin and California’s Central Valley, turned out to contain so many natural and historical treasures.  A mere 20 minute drive from the bustling LA metro and north of the famed Malibu beaches, mountains rose with rugged rock formations and extensive vegetation coverage.  At the visitor center of the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area,  we learned that this area is home to a wide variety of flora and fauna as well as the Native American’s sacred grounds, and therefore a key point of interest to locals for outdoor activities.  Outside the urban life of the City of Angels, this place must be a pure enjoyment for those who wanted to slow down and savor the beauty of life’s another façade.  For us, time was a luxury.  During the short morning in this area, we could only visit the Paramount Ranch, which preserved film sets used for western-style movies.   The dusty roads and false-front buildings blended in the rustic mountain scenes around them, bringing us back to the legendary pioneer times.  The history of film had portrayed valor, love, loyalty and resilience that were the themes of the primal land.  Aside from that, however, how much of reality still exists that could lead us to comprehending the true charisma of the past?

Mountains and Horses
Hills and a horse rental at Paramount Ranch, Santa Monica Mountains
Western town film settings at Paramount Ranch

Hearst Castle, which is 200 miles up north, turn out to be another interesting manifestation of that notion.   On top of the hills along the scenic California State Route 1, accessing the castle was only possible via a shuttle ride, now a state-run park service.  Owned  by newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst,  construction of the mansion lasted 3 decades since the 1910’s, and technically never completed to reach its original full design.  Tt is now among America’s most famous castles,  boasting a compound of historic architectural style across Europe, and the owner’s collection of numerous antiques to decorate the castle.  The front façade of the main building, Casa Grande, was a colossal marble display of fine sculptures, with ornate windows and rails around the towers on the two top sides.  It was nothing but grand, luxurious, and splendid, neither was the interior.  The owner’s attention to details created many admirable elements in the interior design, brought to life by the finest craftsmanship of the time.  Surrounding the main mansion, a number of exquisitely designed smaller buildings served as guestrooms for the celebrities Hearst invited to the castle for the weekend, among which we found the most beloved film stars of all times.  A century later, however, one might argue the glamour of the castle only remained faintly in tourists’ leisurely minds.  How much it encourages or inspires may be a question that invites various answers.

Casa Grande
Hearst Castle’s Casa Grande
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Details on the ceiling of the Gothic Suite
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A guest house
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The indoor Roman Pool

As we descended from the hilltop via a winding path, the castle’s mountainous surroundings started to reveal themselves from the winter’s misty veil, and yet hid itself momentarily, only leaving the rising sun’s golden rays flickering from the distant Pacific Ocean.  Our adventure, fortunately, did not end here.   On the hillside of Highway 1 leading us away from the castle, we surprisingly spotted herds of zebras idly grazing with cattle, a wild and humorous sight no one would have imagined.   They were, in fact, descendants of some residents of Hearst Castle’s private zoo.  Further down the road, a beach crowded with thousands of elephant seals was one of the scenic route’s deserving top tourist spots.  The cool water of the California coast provides them with abundant food, making it optimal feeding grounds for these migrating sea mammals.   Mostly resting, the occasional budging and roaring of the sheer large number of the seals made the beach an extraordinarily lively place.  We found this moment of our trip most delightful.  Among all the busyness of modern life, decorated endeavors sometimes end up being a feeble attempt to celebrate life’s glory.  The plain, humble, unadorned efforts, on the other hand, may become the most relevant, and touching.

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Herd of Zebras at Hearst Ranch
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Bustling elephant seals

In the quaint little town Cambria south of Hearst Castle, we had a delicious Mexican dinner after a long drive, the evening before our castle tour.  Medusa’s Taqueria had a most refreshing chicken salad that struck the jackpot of nutrition and flavor for all of us.

Mexican chicken salad
Mexican chicken salad from our kitchen

Back in our kitchen, we succeeded in replicating this dish, based on a recipe found on recipetineat.com.  We almost followed the recipe step by step, except adding a handful of cucumber slices.  Chicken breasts were marinated with lime, honey, chili, cumin, and oregano, pan-seared to just done before sliced.  The winning combo of vegetables imparted self-complementary crunch and creaminess.  After an exhausting road trip, it was hearty and comforting; on a common Sunday afternoon, it is a dish that the entire family can prepare and appreciate together, a reminder of life’s wonderful richness.  —FXZ and WZ

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